A Barthes Reader (Paperback)

A Barthes Reader By Roland Barthes, Susan Sontag (Editor) Cover Image

A Barthes Reader (Paperback)

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A Barthes Reader gives one the image of Barthes as one of the great public teachers of our time, someone who thought out, argued for, and made available several steps in a penetrating reflection on language sign systems, texts- and what they have to tell us about the concept of being human. Susan Sontag's prefatory essay is one of her finest acts of criticism, informed by intellectual sympathy and a sure sense of the contours of the mind she is describing.

Roland Barthes (1915-1980) was a French cultural and literary critic, whose clever and lyrical writings on semiotics made structuralism one of the leading movements of the twentieth century. Barthes had a cult following and published seventeen books, including Camera Lucida, Mythologies, and A Lover's Discourse.

Susan Sontag was the author of four novels, including In America, which won the 2000 National Book Award for Fiction; a collection of stories; several plays; and seven works of nonfiction. She died in New York City on December 28, 2004.
Product Details ISBN: 9780374521448
ISBN-10: 0374521441
Publisher: Hill and Wang
Publication Date: July 1st, 1983
Pages: 534
Language: English

“Roland Barthes must be counted the most characteristic and important French intellectual of the structuralist generation that gained worldwide attention in the 1960s. Yet as an intellectual authority--maître à penser, as the French tend to say--he cut a curious figure. He detested all forms of authority, worried about the power wielded by the teacher, and called his main subject, literature, 'a grand imposture.' He could be assertive, but always in the mode of counterstatement, affirming the inverse of society's accepted dogmas and myths. . . .

A Barthes Reader gives one the image of Barthes as one of the great public teachers of our time, someone who thought out, argued for, and made available several steps in a penetrating reflection on language sign systems, texts--and what they have to tell us about the concept of being human. His work is always partial, passionate underneath its cool, and preliminary, ready to be superseded or contradicted, yet its pedagogical power is durable. . . . Susan Sontag's prefatory essay is one of her finest acts of criticism, informed by intellectual sympathy and a sure sense of the contours of the mind she is describing.” —Peter Brooks, Yale University

A Barthes Reader gives one the image of Barthes as one of the great public teachers of our time, someone who thought out, argued for, and made available several steps in a penetrating reflection on language sign systems, texts--and what they have to tell us about the concept of being human. His work is always partial, passionate underneath its cool, and preliminary, ready to be superseded or contradicted, yet its pedagogical power is durable. . . . Susan Sontag's prefatory essay is one of her finest acts of criticism, informed by intellectual sympathy and a sure sense of the contours of the mind she is describing.” —Peter Brooks, Yale University