Art for Obama: Designing Manifest Hope and the Campaign for Change - Shepard Fairey, Jennifer Gross

Shepard Fairey, who created an iconic campaign image of Barack Obama, has joined Jennifer Gross in compiling Art For Obama: Designing Manifest Hope and the Campaign for Change (Abrams, $22.50). The widespread support for Obama’s presidential campaign was accompanied by an outpouring of creative work from artists of all sorts.  Musicians produced a CD to raise money. Actors appeared in ads and some worked the polls on election night. Visual artists designed images that were silk-screened for t-shirts and adorned museum walls. Much of this work is reproduced here. The book is amazingly diverse and beautiful. Many of the artists speak about what inspired them to create these pieces. If you’re not over Obama and love art, this is a wonderful way to remember the historic 2008 victory of Barack Obama and the people of the United States.

Art for Obama: Designing Manifest Hope and the Campaign for Change By Shepard Fairey (Editor), Jennifer Gross (Editor) Cover Image
By Shepard Fairey (Editor), Jennifer Gross (Editor)
$22.50
ISBN: 9780810984981
Availability: Special Order—Subject to Availability
Published: Abrams Image - October 1st, 2009

The Bauhaus Group: Six Masters of Modernism - Nicholas Fox Weber

They were extraordinary men and women, The Bauhaus Group: Six Masters of Modernism (Knopf, $40), and art writer Nicholas Fox Weber has produced a wonderful group portrait. Weber has organized the handsome, well-illustrated book around some of the seminal figures at the school: Paul Klee, Wassily Kandinsky, Josef Albers and his wife Anni, and Mies van der Rohe.  No book could better exemplify the marked break between the rigidities of class and culture before 1914 and the modern world we know now. It was a time of loosening inhibitions in more than art, so that an account of Bauhaus is perforce full of life and love. The influence of the Bauhaus School, founded in Weimar in 1919 by Walter Gropius, extends into our time, ninety years later.  Certainly part of the reason is that most of the artists ended up in the United States, chased out of Germany by Hitler. The School itself closed in 1933. It had a shortlife but it unleashed a mighty movement.

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