The Big Bang of Numbers, by Manil Suri

Staff Pick

Suri's elegant, readable book demonstrates that you don't have to be a mathematician to appreciate the charm--even the magic--of numbers. Charting a playful course to existence, this novelist/math professor creates a universe made of mathematical ideas that transports us from nothing to infinity, explaining “mysteries of the universe” and prompting questions about “why are we here."


 

 

The Big Bang of Numbers: How to Build the Universe Using Only Math By Manil Suri Cover Image
$32.50
ISBN: 9781324007036
Availability: Not On Our Shelves—Ships in 1-5 Days
Published: W. W. Norton & Company - September 20th, 2022

Humble Pi, by Matt Parker

Staff Pick

Don't  be put off by the word "math":  Humble Pi: When Math Goes Wrong in the Real World is a fun read--I loved it, and not only couldn't put it down--I wished there were more of it. This is the perfect book for anyone who has ever wondered how math impacts their lives. Matt Parker uses notable real life events to explain complex issues in an easy to understand and entertaining way. He also helps the reader realize how important math always has been, and shows how that importance is only going to increase. Yes, I’m a fan and I recommend this book!

Humble Pi: When Math Goes Wrong in the Real World By Matt Parker Cover Image
$27.00
ISBN: 9780593084687
Availability: Special Order—Subject to Availability
Published: Riverhead Books - January 21st, 2020

Calculating the Cosmos: How Mathematics Unveils the Universe - Ian Stewart

Staff Pick

In Calculating the Cosmos (Basic Books, $27.99) award-winning scientist and math popularizer Ian Stewart takes the majesty and complexity of our universe and explains it, bit by bit, according to how the numbers add up. In addition to showing how math helps us understand the cosmos as it is (and will be), Stewart also humanizes and contextualizes our history of calculations. Through short summaries he explains how we came to better understand the universe, detailing our record of insights, mistakes, recalculations, and lucky guesses. Discussing everything from how the bodies in our solar system affect each other to whether dark matter exists, and on to speculations about how new discoveries may guide future deep space exploration, this book is for anyone who is fascinated by looking at the stars and wants to better understand their—and our—place in the universe.

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