A CONSTELLATION OF VITAL PHENOMENA by Anthony Marra

May 13, 2013

Anthony Marra spoke about his book, A Constellation of Vital Phenomena, at Politics & Prose on Monday, May 13, 2013.

Marra’s first novel is a vivid evocation of the heartbreak and resilience of war-torn Chechnya. Unfolding over five days in 2004, with generous flashbacks through the preceding decade, the narrative charts the literal and emotional minefield that is the village of Eldár, a place of missing fathers, missing sisters, and missing limbs. Focusing on eight-year-old Hakaa and the two doctors—the last in the area—who care for her, the story weaves past and present, betrayal and loyalty, for a novel that’s as brutally realistic as it is lyrically graceful.

A Constellation of Vital Phenomena: A Novel By Anthony Marra Cover Image
$18.00
ISBN: 9780770436421
Availability: Not On Our Shelves—Ships in 1-5 Days
Published: Hogarth - February 4th, 2014

THE SMART ONE by Jennifer Close

April 7, 2013

Jennifer Close spoke about her book, The Smart One, at Politics & Prose on Sunday, April 7, 2013.

In her second work of fiction, the author of Girls in White Dresses—and former P&P bookseller—offers a witty and insightful look at what happens when a parent of adult children does not have an empty nest. Weezey Coffey raised three children, only to have them return: one after a failed career, another after a broken engagement, and the third while in thrall to a high-maintenance girlfriend.

The Smart One (Vintage Contemporaries) By Jennifer Close Cover Image
$18.00
ISBN: 9780307743701
Availability: Not On Our Shelves—Ships in 1-5 Days
Published: Vintage - July 16th, 2013

MO SAID SHE WAS QUIRKY by James Kelman

May 6, 2013

James Kelman spoke about his book, Mo Said She Was Quirky, at Politics & Prose on Monday, May 6, 2013.

The new novel from the Scottish Man Booker-winning author of How Late it Was, How Late chronicles one twenty-four-hour span in the lives of Helen and her family. Poor, working class, sensitive to injustice and seeing it everywhere, Helen, in Kelman’s richly evocative prose, offers a candid look at today’s struggling Glaswegians.

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